The premises of Charles Julius Kino

 

London workmen, 1888
Anonymous

A large format albumen print showing workmen refitting the premises of Charles Julius Kino, a tailor of 164 Fenchurch Street, London. According to a pencilled inscription verso in a modern hand, the photograph was taken on Tuesday morning, 25 September 1888.

Kino appears on the 1881 census, living at 3 Edinburgh Terrace, Kensington, with his wife Louisa and their three young children. A British subject born in Russia, he was 40 years old and gave 'Woollen Warehouseman' as his profession. The household included a governess, a nurse, two housemaids and a cook.

He subsequently changed his name, becoming Charles Julius Knowles. He died, aged 58, on 17 February 1900 at 17 Kensington Gore, London, leaving an estate valued at a phenomenal £1,222,786. His collection of works by the French artist Alphonse Legros was given to the British Museum by his son in 1953.

Photographer unidentified.

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections but is otherwise in fine condition, with good tonal range. It is affixed to a mount of cream-coloured Bristol board. This presents some faint foxing and a few marks, both recto in its margins and verso, but is otherwise firm and solid. The tip of its upper right-hand corner is missing. A thin red, printed border surrounds the print.

Dimensions: the print measures 6” by 8.4” 915.5 cm by 21.4 cm); the mount measures 10.4” by 13.4” (26.5 cm by 34 cm).

 


price:  £225
code: cat001
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Street Life in London

London nomads, 1878
John Thomson

A Woodburytype showing a friendly group gathered around William Hampton’s caravan on a piece of vacant land in Battersea. The woman seated on the steps, Mary Pratt ('old Mary Pradd') was murdered a few weeks after the photograph was taken.

In the text that accompanied the photograph, Thomson recalled that: 'The poor woman who met her end in so mysterious a manner had in life the look of being a decent, inoffensive creature. Clean and respectable in her dress, she might in her youth have been even of comely appearance, but now she wore the indelible stamp of a woman who had been dulled and deadened by a hard life.’

John Thomson, in collaboration with the journalist Adolphe Smith, published a monthly magazine from 1876 to 1877 entitled Street Life in London. The project, an early experiment in photojournalism, documented the lives of the poor and the marginalized in the capital of the Empire. The photographs and accompanying text were subsequently published as a book in 1878.

Condition: the print is in excellent condition, with all the rich and satisfying tones one would expect from a Woodburytype. The page on which it is mounted presents a few small marks and imperfections but is otherwise crisp and clean. A printed red border surrounds the print and a caption in red in the lower margin gives its title.

Dimensions: the print measures 4.3” by 3.25” (10.9 cm by 8.3 cm); the page measures 10.6” by 8.2” (27 cm by 20.9 cm).


price:  £400
code: cat002
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Railway disaster at Awse Junction, Gloucestershire

 

The wreck of the Rob Roy, 1868
Richard H. Barrett of Gloucester

A large format albumen print showing the derailed Rob Roy, a Great Western Railway locomotive. On 5 November 1868 it crashed into the back of a cattle truck at Awse Junction near Newnham in Gloucestershire. Three men were killed – a farmer, a cattle drover and a railway guard – and six were injured in the collision.

According to a report on the investigation into the accident, ‘The Rob Roy is the largest broad-gauge engine ever built, weighing 40 tons. It was constructed by Stephenson, and to the great strength of is material and build the engine-driver and fireman, and very probably the passengers, owe their lives. The comparatively little damage sustained by the engine is truly remarkable, considering that it was going at something like 45 miles an hour when it encountered the opposing body. […] The scene that immediately followed the collision is said to have been something dreadful, occasioned by the cries and struggles of the poor cattle, the larger number of which died from suffocation. Many, however, were found so crushed that their carcases were held together only by their skins.’

The Rob Roy, on the other hand, emerged relatively unscathed. ‘The forcing in of the smoke-box, the bending of the buffers, and the splitting of the 3 inch steal tire on the fore near wheel is all the damage done to the Rob Roy, the whole of which it is said can be repaired for a fifty-pound note. This, however, is not the case with the cattle trucks. They were built in the usual way, covered with sheet iron roofs. These, however, were no more than sheets of paper under the pressure of the Rob Roy, so that they fell in upon the cattle, smothering and crushing them to atoms. As soon as practicable the live beasts were extricated from their plunging positions, but before this could be done many of them half kicked each other to death’ (Gloucester Journal, 14 November 1868).

The man in the top hat standing next to the smokestack is the GWR's chief engineer William George Owen.

Photographed by Richard H. Barrett of Gloucester.

Condition: the print is in excellent condition, with good tonal range. It is mounted on a piece of cream-coloured card, which is clean, crisp and firm. A blindstamp at the lower right-hand corner identifies the photographer. The word ‘Copyright’ has been inked in the lower margin in an elegant copperplate script, although Barrett in fact never entered the image at Stationers’ Hall.

Dimensions: the print measures 7.8” by 9.7” (19.8 cm by 24.4 cm); the mount measures 9.5” by 12” (24.1 cm by 30.5 cm).


price:  £300
code: cat003
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Railway workers

 

British navvies
G. Edwards of Peckham

A glossy gelatin silver print showing manual labourers employed to build and maintain the railway system. The word ‘navvy’ is a shortened form of ‘navigator’ (UK) or ‘navigational engineer’ (US), men who worked on major engineering projects. The term was coined in the late 18th century in Great Britain during a period when numerous canals were under construction, which were sometimes known as ‘navigations.’ In the 19th century, this ever-fluctuating workforce was essential to the construction of the railways.

Contrary to popular opinion, only some 30% of these manual labourers came from Ireland. Census returns and railway contracts conclusively demonstrate that the great majority of navvies in Britain were English.

Photographed by G. Edwards of Peckham, identified by wetstamps in the lower margin.

Condition: the print has very good tonal range. The mount is somewhat grubby and presents some corner wear; its upper left-hand corner is missing entirely. A thin printed decorative border in red surrounds the print.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.8” b7 7.7” (14.7 cm by 19.5 cm); the mount measures 9.9” by 11.9” (25.1 cm by 30.2 cm).


price:  £50
code: cat004
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
British workmen

British workmen
David Bowen and Sons of Haverfordwest

A cabinet card portrait of six young workers. Five of the men are smoking, either a cigarette or a pipe, and one of the men is holding that most important of tools for the British workman, a kettle.

Photographed by David Bowen and Sons of Haverfordwest and Milford Haven in Wales.

Condition: the print presents various marks and imperfections as well as some damage to its surface but despite these defects is overall in reasonably good condition, with good tonal range. The mount presents some edge and corner wear and is extremely dirty, both recto and verso.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £60
code: cat005
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
British workmen


Workmen in Bolton
Anonymous

An albumen print portrait of a group of British workers in their soiled, worn workwear. The bowler-hatted man in a suit standing on the far left is presumably a foreman.

Photographer and location unidentified but, according to the last owner, the location is probably Bolton, historically a part of Lancashire but now a town in Greater Manchester. A pencilled inscription verso in a modern hand attributes the photograph to an ‘F. Wylde’’ but I’ve been unable to confirm whether or not a photographer with this name operated in the Bolton area.

Condition: the print is in excellent condition, with good tonal range. The mount presents some faint foxing verso and a small amount of corner wear but is otherwise clean, firm and solid. A red decorative border surrounds the print.

Dimensions: the print measures 4” by 5.9” (10 cm by 15 cm); the mount measures 7.8” by 9.9” (19.8 cm by 25.1 cm). 


price:  £35
code: cat006
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Decauville factory at Petit-Bourg

 

The Decauville factory
Anonymous

Two unmounted gelatin silver prints showing the interior of the Decauville factory at Petit-Bourg near Corbeil, a southern suburb of Paris.

The manufacturing company was founded by Paul Decauville (1846-1922), a pioneer in industrial railways. Its narrow-gauge railway system could be disassembled and transported very easily; it was used on construction sites, to transport goods within towns, and occasionally to serve as feeder lines to river ports or a larger railroad. In 1898 the factory branched out into automobile production.

Photographer unidentified.

Condition: both prints present some faint mottling in the darker areas near their lower edge but overall are in excellent condition, with good tonal range and sharp details. They are printed on thick, heavy, cream-coloured stock. One print has a light diagonal crease across one corner.

Dimensions: both prints measure 7.3” by 9.5” (18.5 cm by 24.2 cm).


price:  £100
code: cat007
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Ferndale Colliery disaster

 

Miners rescued from the Ferndale colliery disaster, 1867
William and Daniel Downey of Newcastle and London

A carte-de-visite portrait showing some of the coal miners rescued after the gas explosion in No. 1 pit at Ferndale Colliery in the Rhondda Valley on 8 November 1867. The accident claimed the lives of 178 miners. 

A few days later The Times reported on what it called ‘one of the most disastrous colliery explosions ever recorded. It was stated that 300 persons were in the colliery when the accident occurred, but is has since been ascertained that the number was greater. At 2 p.m. on Friday afternoon there were from 300 to 400 men underground, the exact number up to the hour of writing not being known. Of those who went down on Friday morning, some 62 have been brought up alive, but all hopes of rescuing the others have been abandoned. […] Many of the bodies that have been brought to the surface are frightfully burnt, the clothing completely destroyed, and in some cases portions of the body have been literally burnt away, the charred remains presenting a sickening and frightful spectacle’ (The Times, 11 November 1867).

The following day the journal gave details of the efforts to rescue the survivors. ‘The operations for the rescue of the men still alive and the recovery of the bodies buried in the Ferndale colliery were continued uninterruptedly all last night, and to some extent with gratifying results. About 9 o’clock one of the men, under the direction of Mr Curnew, thought he heard a groan close by, and upon that the whole party, who were working in complete darkness, agreed to rest a few moments. They sat down and remained silent, and in the course of a few moments another groan was heard close beside them. One of them asked where the voice came from, and having been answered, proceeded to the spot on hands and knees, and found a young man of about 24 years of age lying in the airway. He was immediately removed and taken out, but was so stupefied by his long confinement that he could give no information beyond this – that until about three hours before his rescue he was followed by another man, but since then he had not heard him. A mining engineer who went down today thought that, with the utmost expedition, it would be impossible to get at the 29 men who are on the east level until midnight tonight’ (The Times, 12 November 1867).

Less than two years later another explosion at the same colliery killed another 53 men and boys.

Photographed by William and Daniel Downey of Newcastle and London.

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections but is otherwise in excellent condition, with very good tonal range. The mount is clean, firm and solid, with crisp edges and sharp corners.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard carte-de-visite are 4.1" by 2.5" (10.5 cm by 6.3 cm).


price:  £90
code: cat008
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Mary Harrison, aged 16

A pit brow lass in Wigan
Herbert Wragg of Wigan

A cabinet card portrait of Mary Harrison, a 16-year-old pit brow lass, seen here posing with the tools of her trade.

Pit brow lasses worked on the surface at British collieries, picking stones from the coal after it had been brought up from the mines. Prior to the Mines and Collieries Act 1842, women and girls had worked down in the mines alongside their menfolk.

Photographed by Herbert Wragg of Wigan in Lancashire.

Condition: both the print and the mount are in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 

 


price:  £200
code: cat009
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Belgian coal miners

 

Coal miners in Belgium, 1902
L. Mengeot of Châtelet

A cabinet card portrait of four coal miners with their Davy lamps, photographed at Châtelet, a Walloon municipality on the river Sambre in the Belgian province of Hainault. By the nineteenth century, the main economic drivers of the entire Sambre valley were coal and heavy industry.

An inked inscription verso in Flemish translates as: 'Souvenir of our friend Karel. The coal mine "Ormont" of Chatelet [sic], visited by us on 19 July 1902.’

Photographed by Léandre Joseph Mengeot of Châtelet, later Mengeot Frères. The studio’s registers for the period 1901 to 1936 have survived, as have some 27,000 of their glass plate negatives. These are held by Société Royale d’Histoire Le Vieux Châtelet

Condition: the print has limited tonal range and presents a few small imperfections; it is otherwise in reasonably good condition. The mount presents some stains and foxing recto and verso but is firm and solid. Printed paper labels pasted over the name of the studio's previous operator indicate that Mengeot had only recently taken over the premises.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 


price:  £25
code: cat010
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Coal miners

 

Coal miners
Anonymous

An albumen print showing a large group of coal miners with their Davy lamps and pickaxes. The three suited and bowler-hatted men interspersed amongst the group are presumably management of some kind.

Photographer and location unidentified.

Condition: the print has limited tonal range but is otherwise in good condition. It is mounted on a sheet of Bristol board which has been trimmed to the same dimensions as the print. The mount presents some foxing and discolouration verso.

Dimensions: both the print and its mount measure 5.9” by 8.3” (15 cm by 21.1 cm).

 


price:  £20
code: cat011
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Gold prospectors in South Africa

 

Prospecting for gold in South Africa
Anonymous

Two albumen prints relating to gold mining in South Africa, mounted recto and verso on the same album page. The first is titled simply ‘Prospectors’, while the second is titled ‘Gold fields of South Africa / Alluvial Digging’. Both inscriptions are pencilled in a period hand in the lower margin.

Photographer(s) unidentified.

Condition: the first print presents some sunning at its upper edge but overall has very good tonal range. The second print is in excellent condition but the original negative appears to have been damaged at the upper left-hand corner. The album page on which they are both mounted has yellowed a little with age at its edge; in addition, there is a small amount of warping in the upper and lower margins but the prints are unaffected. 

Dimensions: the first print, the one titled ‘Prospectors,' measures 5.9” by 8.4” (15 cm by 21.2 cm). The second print measures 5.1” by 7.3” (13.2 cm by 19.8 cm). The album page measures 8.1” by 10.7” (22 cm by 27 cm).

 


price:  £100
code: cat012
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Cornish miners in South Africa

 

Cornish miners at Pigg’s Peak, Swaziland
Anonymous

An albumen print showing a group of eighteen Cornish miners in Swaziland (modern day Eswatini).

It is estimated that between 1861 and 1901 a quarter of a million Cornish migrated abroad. These emigrants included farmers, merchants and tradesmen, but miners made up most of the numbers. The Cornish economy profited from the miners’ work abroad, since many men sent back ‘home pay,’ which helped to keep their families out of the workhouse. By 1905 there were some 7000 Cornish miners on the Rand in South Africa, and about one million pounds a year was being sent back to Cornwall from the Transvaal alone.

A pencilled inscription in a period hand in the lower margin reads ‘Cornish miners at Pigg’s Peak.’ The town of Pigg’s Peak grew up after the discovery of gold there in 1881. Three years later William Pigg struck a gold mine, which for 80 years was the largest in the country.

Photographer unidentified.

On the reverse of the album page there is another, similarly sized photograph showing a rather dull landscape titled ‘Havelock G. M. Co., Swaziland’ [presumably standing for ‘Havelock Gold Mining Company.’]

Condition: the print is in excellent condition with good tonal range. The album page presents a small amount of foxing and has yellowed a little with age at its edges. Also, the album page has warped slightly in its upper and lower margins, but the print is unaffected.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.6” by 8.1” (13.9 cm by 20.5 cm); the album page measures 9” by 11.4” (23 cm by 29 cm).


price:  £70
code: cat013
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Cerro Verde, Baja California

 

Copper mining in Mexico, 1896
Anonymous

A small collection of five cabinet cards (one not shown) relating to copper mining at Cerro Verde in Baja California. The mounts all carry inked inscriptions verso [in French] identifying the views and giving details. All five are dated 1896.

The first shows the point of extraction at San Luiz [sic]; the second shows ‘la tienda’ [the shop] with a group of miners from Cerro Verde, ‘one of the groups of which I am in charge,’ arranged in front of a low building: the third shows the point of extraction and the chief engineer’s house at Cerro Verde; the fourth shows the new office at Santa Rosalia on pay day.

The fifth cabinet card (scan available on request) is the one with the most extensive inscription. It shows a group of Mexican workers at a small oasis at Santa Agueda ‘about 3 hours by mule from Santa Rosalia, where there is running water and greenery.’

According to Borderman: The Memoirs of Federico José Maria Rondstadt (1993), in the mid-1870s the mines belonged to Mueller & Co but several years later they were sold to a French company known as ‘Sta. Rosalia – El Boleo.’

Photographer(s) unidentified.

Condition: the prints all present a few small imperfections and the one showing the new office at Santa Rosalia on pay day presents some mottled discolouration in the area of the sky. Otherwise, the prints are in fine condition, with good tonal range. One mount presents some foxing verso and another has sustained a small amount of corner wear. Otherwise, the mounts are in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £200
code: cat014
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Carpenters

Carpenters
Anonymous

 

A carte-de-visite portrait of five unidentified men, presumably all carpenters. Judging by the men’s clothing, the photograph was not taken in Great Britain. I would surmise it was taken somewhere in the United States.

Two of the men are each holding a saw, one man has a beaker and a mug, and the man at the back is holding what appears to be a wine bottle by its neck.

Photographer and location unidentified [reverse is blank].

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections but is otherwise in fine condition, with good tonal range. The mount is clean and firm, with crisp edges and sharp corners.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard carte-de-visite are 4.1" by 2.5" (10.5 cm by 6.3 cm).


price:  £60
code: cat015
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
A cobbler

A cobbler with the tools of his trade
Anonymous

A cabinet card portrait of a cobbler surrounded by the tools of his trade, including a large metal last, an array of different sized awls and a wooden tray of nails. The man appears to have been photographed in his own back yard, with flowerpots on the windowsill behind him.

Photographer and location unidentified.

Condition: the print presents numerous small imperfections but overall is in reasonably good condition. The mount presents some edge and corner wear but is firm and solid.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £30
code: cat016
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Great International Fisheries Exhibition

 

Scottish fisherwomen, 1883
The London Stereoscopic Company

A cabinet card showing a group of Scottish fisherwomen who participated in the Great International Fisheries Exhibition, which was held in South Kensington between 12 May and 31 October 1883. One of the many world’s fairs that took place in the second half of the nineteenth-century, the exhibition was the largest special event held anywhere in the world up to that point.

‘The fisherwomen from Scotland and various places abroad who attended the opening of the Fisheries Exhibition were received by the Prince and Princess of Wales at Marlborough House yesterday. Altogether there are forty-eight of these visitors, of whom ten are Belgian and Flemish, fifteen are Boulonnaise, eight are Dutch, and fifteen Scotch. They arrived at a quarter to three yesterday afternoon at the side entrance of Marlborough House, their advent creating some excitement, owing to their costumes. […] All the women wore their Sunday or holiday attire. […] The party were ranged in line along the lawn opposite the doors leading to the drawing-rooms, from which the Prince of Wales escorted the Princess, together with their two sons, the Princes Albert Victor and George, and the three Princesses of Wales, the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, and Princess Henry of the Netherlands. The Prince and Princess were much interested, and conversed freely with the fisherwomen, who seemed delighted and astonished at their reception. After a few minutes the royal party retired, and the fisherwomen were shown through the drawing-rooms of Marlborough House, and entertained at luncheon before leaving.’ That morning they had already been to church: ‘the Roman Catholics to the Carmelite Church in Kensington, the Dutch to the Netherlands Church, and the Scotch to the Presbyterian Chapel in Crown-court’ (St James’s Gazette, 14 May 1883).

Following their reception at Marlborough House, the rest of the day was taken up with a visit to the Zoological Gardens and a tour of Baroness Burdett-Coutts’s residence at Stratton Place, Piccadilly. The previous day the women had been shown over the Mansion House and Guildhall, before visiting the City Fish Market and Meat Market. In the evening some had visited Her Majesty’s Theatre while others had been taken to the Oxford Music Hall.

Photographed by the London Stereoscopic Company. The image was registered at Stationers’ Hall on 19 May 1883.

Condition: both the print and the mount are in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £75
code: cat017
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Eastern Counties Dairy Institute

 

The Eastern Counties Dairy Institution
W. Bond of Norwich

A cabinet card showing women at the Eastern Counties Dairy Institute, photographed in the mid-1890s. The following is an extract from an Ipswich newspaper dated 1893: 'A ten day series of dairy classes has lately been given Miss Blackshaw the principal lecturer for the Eastern Counties Dairy Institute. The classes were held in a barn at Street farm [and] were well attended by pupils and others. The pupils, who each had a churn, are the wives and daughters of farmers as well as bailiff's wives.'

Photographed by W. Bond of Norwich.

Condition: the print is in excellent condition, with very good tonal range. The mount presents a very small amount of wear at one corner but is otherwise also in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 


price:  £60
code: cat018
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Agricultural workers

Agricultural workers
Hellis & Sons of London

A cabinet card portrait of four unidentified men, presumably farmhands or agricultural workers of some type. Two of the men are leaning on pitchforks and curiously two bottles of spirits have been prominently placed in the foreground at their feet.

Photographed by Hellis and Sons of London.

Born in Clerkenwell in 1835, Robert Hellis followed various professions before he established his first studio in London’s Notting Hill in 1870. By the 1890s, he and his sons were operating numerous branches throughout the Greater London area. He died at Lewisham on 18 June 1895, leaving an estate valued at £7100. The business he had founded continued under his sons’ management for some thirty years more.

Condition: the print is in good condition. The mount presents a small amount of damage at one edge but is otherwise clean, firm and solid.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £20
code: cat019
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Servants at Liddington

 

Servants at Liddington, 1864
Anonymous

A large format albumen print showing a group of servants. The man on the far right, standing beside a watering can, is holding a besom, while the girl beside him has a large brush hanging from her belt. At the other end of the group, the girl on the far left is holding a fowl of some kind that she’ll doubtless have to pluck later, while another girl is holding a dead rabbit or hare. Strangely, the uniformed boy lying on the ground, presumably a young footman, is posed beside a glass and a bottle and there is another bottle and further glasses on the small table at the centre of the group. The older man at the centre of the back row is also holding a bottle.

A pencilled inscription in a period hand in the lower margin reads: ‘Servants Taken at Liddington, 1864.’ In addition, several names have been added in pen and pencil in various hands below the print. These include Mrs Taylor, William and Clara Butts, Greenwood, Martin and Elizabeth.

Presumably the inscription refers to the village of Liddington in Wiltshire but no gazetteer of the period lists any house large enough to maintain a staff of ten servants. I’ve scoured both the 1861 and the 1871 censuses for a combination of these names in the vicinity of Liddington but so far without success. The name of the house and the identity of these servants' employer therefore remain unknown.

Photographer unidentified.

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections but is otherwise in very good condition. It is mounted a piece of stiff, firm, cream-coloured card which is turn is mounted on a much larger sheet of soft, buff-coloured paper. The latter has darkened a little with age at its edges.

Dimensions: the print measures 6” by 7.9” (15.2 cm by 20.2 cm); the large sheet of paper measures 11.5” by  16.1” (29.2 cm by 41 cm).

 


price:  £90
code: cat020
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Street vendor with donkey cart

 

Street vendor
Anonymous

An unmounted gelatin silver print showing a street vendor with his donkey and donkey cart.

Photographer and location unidentified.

Condition: the print presents a light diagonal crease at one corner but is otherwise in excellent condition, with good tonal range.

Dimensions: the print measures 4.4” by 5.8” (11.1 cm by 14.9 cm).


price:  £20
code: cat027
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Farriers

 

Practical Smith and Farrier, 1902
Anonymous

A large format, slightly glossy print showing a young farrier at work shoeing a horse. In true British tradition, two men are actually doing some work while four more are standing around doing nothing.

The name of the farrier on the signage above the entrance is all obscured by all the small glass jars containing candles, which have been put up as decorations to celebrate the coronation of King Edward VII on 9 August 1902. However, with a strong lens it is possible to make out the information that ‘J. Nettelton MRSVS’ [Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons] attends here at 12 noon daily.’ John Nettelton, Veterinary Surgeon, appears on the 1901 census living at 47 St Mary Abbotts Terrace, Kensington.  The sign, however, was out of date in 1902, as Nettetlton died suddenly at his home in Kensington on 12 November 1901.

A sign on the door (behind the man resting his hand on a boy's shoulder) informs the public that the establishment will be closed 'by royal warrant' on Saturday 9 August, while on the clapboard building next door more jam jars spell out the letters 'E.R.' for Edwardus Rex. 

Photographer and location unidentified.

Condition: the print has slightly limited tonal range but is otherwise in reasonably good condition. The mount is in extremely poor condition, having been very roughly trimmed at all four of his edges.

Dimensions: the print measures 8” by 6.1” (15.6 cm by 20.7 cm); the mount measures approximately 7.2” by 9.3” (18.3 cm by 23.5 cm).


price:  £35
code: cat028
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Horse-drawn tram in South London

 

Horse-drawn tram in South London
Anonymous 

A slightly glossy silver print showing a horse tram and crew in the depot, specifically Horsecar No 271 used on the Camberwell Green to St George’s Church route in South London. Both the driver and the conductor are wearing enamel PCO [Public Carriage Office] licences. The photograph was probably taken in the late 1890s.

The first generation of horse-drawn trams begin operating in 1860 along Victoria Street in Westminster. Although the service proved popular with passengers, many road users objected to the tram rails, which were raised above the surface of the road and caused an obstruction for other traffic. Eventually Parliament passed legislation permitting tram services, so long as the rails were recessed into the carriageway. Fares were set at 1 d (one penny) per mile, with half-price early and late services for workers. London’s last trams, which by then ran on electricity rather than horsepower, were phased out in 1952.

Photographer unidentified.

Condition: the print presents some faintly mottled tones towards its upper edge but is otherwise in fine condition, with good tonal range. It is mounted on a sheet of two-tone Bristol board. The mount presents some marks and stains verso and the tip of one corner is missing.

Dimensions: the print measures 6” by 8.2” (152 cm by 20.9 cm); the mount measures 9.9” by 11.9” (25.2 cm by 30.1 cm).

 


price:  £70
code: cat023
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Stamford Town Band

 

Stamford Town Band
Anonymous

A slightly glossy silver print showing the musicians of the Stamford Town Band, illustrating that life for the working classes wasn’t all dirt and grime, particularly as the century neared its close and workers increasingly found themselves with leisure time to fill.

Stamford is a town on the River Welland in Lincolnshire. The earliest mention of its town band in the local paper is in 1888. 'The Stamford town band promises to be successful in its future course. About 10l has already been collected for new and good instruments' (Stamford Mercury, 6 January 1888).

Within a few months the newspaper was enthusiastically reporting on the band's performances. 'The Stamford Town Band gave a selection of music in Red Lion-square on Good Friday, before a large crowd of people. The members of the band, 20 in number, were attired in their new uniform, and presented a very smart appearance. On Easter Monday, after playing in the square and round the town they gave an open-air concert in the football field in the Wolthorpe-road, when they were assisted by the Uppingham Mutual Improvement Society brass band. Mr Bradshaw conducted, and the music was thoroughly enjoyed by a large company' (Stamford Mercury, 6 April 1888).

Photographer unidentified.

Condition: the print presents slightly mottled tones in the area of the drum but is otherwise in excellent condition, with very good tonal range. It is mounted on a sheet of cut-down, buff-coloured Bristol board with a decorative red border printed around the photograph. The mount presents some stains, some foxing and some surface dirt both recto and verso.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.4” by 7.1” (13.9 cm by 18.1 cm).

 


price:  £55
code: cat024
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs