John Hamilton Gillespie

John Hamilton Gillespie
John Moffat of Edinburgh

A cabinet card portrait of John Hamilton Gillespie (1852-1923), seen here wearing the uniform of the Royal Company of Archers, the sovereign's bodyguard in Scotland.

‘Ham’ Gillespie was born at Moffat in Dumfriesshire on 14 October 1852, the son of Sir John Gillespie, head of the Florida Mortgage and Investment Company. He studied law at St Andrews and served as an officer in the Volunteer movement, joining the 1st Midlothian Artillery as a Sub-Lieutenant on 23 May 1877. On 10 October 1878 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and on 14 March 1883 he attained the rank of Captain. He resigned his commission on 14 February 1885.

The following year he was sent out to Florida to manage his father's concerns there. He built the DeSoto, the first hotel in Sarasota, and laid out a golf course there, one of the first in the United States. He served as the first Mayor of Sarasota, and was subsequently re-elected a further five times. He died on 7 September 1923 of a heart attack, while playing golf on the course that he had built.

Photographed by John Moffat of 125 Princes Street, Edinburgh.

Condition: the print presents a few small dark marks in the area of the background but is otherwise in excellent condition, with good tonal range. The mount is clean, firm and solid. An inked inscription verso in a period hand identifies the sitter.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £300
code: cat001
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Charles Linder Pott

Lieutenant Charles L. Pott of the Artists’ Rifles
Lawrence Lowe of London

A signed cabinet card portrait of artist and illustrator Charles Linder Pott (1865-1909), seen here wearing the uniform of the Artists’ Rifles. The regimental badge can clearly be seen on his collar. Designed by William Wyon, the Queen’s medallist, it consisted of two heads: Mars, God of War, and Minerva, Goddess of Wisdom, the latter chosen to represent the fine arts. Until 1914 the regimental full dress uniform was light grey with white facings, silver buttons and braid.

Born on 9 January 1865, Charles Linder Pott was the eldest son of artist Laslett John Pott, who exhibited a total of 43 paintings at the Royal Academy between 1860 and 1897. In 1889 he joined the 20th Middlesex (Artists’) Volunteers. By 1906 he had risen to the rank of  ‘Capt. and Hon. Major’ (Volunteer Service Gazette and Military Dispatch, 22 June 1906).

On 2 August 1893 he married Mary Rose Lane, elder daughter of Frederick Quincey Lane of Berkhampsted. The couple appear on the 1901 census, living at Pinner in Middlesex with two of Charles’s siblings.

Charles Linder Pott died, aged only 44, on 23 October 1909 at Hatch End in Middlesex, leaving an estate valued at £1038. He was buried in Paines Lane Cemetery in Pinner.

Photographed by Lawrence Lowe of St John’s Wood, London.

The portrait has been signed ‘Charles L. Pott / Lieut.’ by the sitter in ink recto in the lower margin.

From an album presented to Thomas Dolling Bolton by Colonel Edis and the officers of the 20th Middlesex Artists’ Rifle Volunteers ‘in gratitude for his hospitality at Easter 1895.’ Thomas Bolton was for many years the Member of Parliament (Liberal) for North East Derbyshire.

Condition: the print presents some small marks and imperfections in the area of the background but has very good tonal range. The mount is firm, solid and very clean.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 


price:  £50
code: cat002
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Henry Allan Roughton May

Captain Henry A. R. May of the Artists’ Rifles
Herbert Rose Barraud of London

A signed cabinet card portrait of Captain (later Colonel) Henry May (1863-1930), who for many years served with, and later commanded, the Artists’ Rifles, one of the many volunteer forces established in the late 1850s and early 1860s as a response to the perceived threat of a French invasion.

Born on 23 August 1863 at Quebec in Canada, Henry Allan Roughton May was the younger son of stockbroker Henry May, later of 30 Mecklenburg Square, London.

A solicitor by profession, he was one of the founders of the firm Minet, May & Co of Dowgate Hill, EC4.

In 1882 he joined the Artists’ Rifles. He commanded the regiment from 1912 to 1915 and again from 1919 to 1920. He served in the First World War and was mentioned in despatches before being invalided home.

On 15 August 1889, at St Edmund’s Church in the village of Caister on the coast of Norfolk, he married Fanny Rose Allen, youngest daughter of Thomas Allen of Markshall near Norwich. The couple appear on the 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses living with one servant at 1 Victoria Villas, Eastern Road, East Finchley in Hornsey. Their marriage did not produce any children.

In 1929 Colonel May published Memories of the Artists’ Rifles. According to a review in The Scotsman (13 January 1930), this was ‘written with an engaging vivacity of manner that makes it enjoyable and inspiriting to read, it is at the same time a noteworthy and valuable regimental history, sure of a welcome both among those ‘Artists’ to whom it more particularly and intimately appeals and among other readers, retracing the general history of the war and of the British Army.’

Colonel May died, aged 66, on 10 April 1930 at 18 Eastern Road, Fortis Green, Middlesex. He left an estate valued at £27,246.

Photographed by Herbert Rose Barraud of 263 Oxford Street, London.

The portrait has been inscribed and signed in ink by the sitter recto across the lower margin. The inscription reads: ‘Yours truly / H.A.R. May / Capt. Artists R.V.’

From an album presented to Thomas Dolling Bolton by Colonel Edis and the officers of the 20th Middlesex Artists’ Rifle Volunteers ‘in gratitude for his hospitality at Easter 1895.’ Thomas Bolton was for many years the Member of Parliament (Liberal) for North East Derbyshire.

Condition: the print presents a few small, faint imperfections in the area of the background but is otherwise in excellent condition, as is the mount.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 


price:  £60
code: cat003
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Lord Roberts

Lord Roberts of Kandahar, V.C.
The London Stereoscopic Company

A cabinet card portrait of Frederick Sleigh Roberts (1832-1914), created 1st Earl of Kandahar, Pretoria and Waterford in 1901. During the war in South Africa, he served as the last Commander-in-Chief of the British Army.

Born at Cawnpore in India, he was the son of General Sir Abraham Roberts. Educated at Eton, he entered Sandhurst in 1847 and then attended the East India Company’s college at Addiscombe. In 1851 he joined the Bengal Artillery.

During the Indian Mutiny, Roberts was at the siege of Delhi and at the second relief of Lucknow. He won the Victoria Cross at Khudaganj in April 1858. During the years that followed he rose steadily in rank.

In 1879-1880, during the Second Afghan War, he undertook a march from Kabul to Kandahar, transporting 10,000 soldiers and 8000 camp-followers over 300 miles in 22 days. He was commander-in-chief in Ireland (1895-1899) before assuming supreme command (1899) in the Anglo-Boer War. His services were distinguished, and he was rewarded with an earldom. At the outbreak of the First World War he became the Colonel-in-Chief of Overseas and Indian Forces. He led an Indian expeditionary force dispatched to France in 1914 but died at St Omer on 14 November 1914. He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral.

Photographed by the London Stereoscopic Company.

Condition: the print presents slightly mottled tones in the area of the background but is otherwise in excellent condition, as is the mount.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £40
code: cat004
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Sir George White

General Sir George White, V.C.
Window and Grove of London

A cabinet card portrait of General Sir George White (1835-1912), an officer of the British Army and recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Born at Rock Castle in Portstewart, County Derry, he was educated at King William’s College on the Isle of Man and Bromsgrove School in Worcestershire. After graduating from Sandhurst, he was commissioned into the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot and saw service in the Indian Mutiny. He fought in the Second Afghan War in 1879 as second-in-command of the 92nd Regiment of Foot (later the Gordon Highlanders).

He was awarded his Victoria Cross when he was 44 years old, for his actions during an engagement at Charasiah in Afghanistan on 6 October 1879.

In 1881 he became the commanding officer of the 92nd Foot. He was knighted in 1886 for his military service in Burma and in 1893 he became the Commander-in-Chief in India. He was commander of the garrison at the Siege of Ladysmith (1899-1900) during the Second Boer War. From 1900 to 1904 he served as Governor of Gibraltar and in 1903 he was made field marshal. He died in the Chelsea Hospital on 24 June 1912.

His statue stands in London’s Portland Place and his Victoria Cross is on display at the Gordon Highlanders Museum in Aberdeen.

Photographed by Window and Grove of Baker Street, London.

Condition: the print presents some fine spotting but has very good tonal range. The mount presents some heavy foxing verso and some fainter foxing recto in the lower margin; it is otherwise clean, firm and solid.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £80
code: cat005
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Seaforth Highlander

A Seaforth Highlander in India
Rhagunath Singh of Nasirabad

A cabinet card portrait of an unidentified soldier of the Seaforth Highlanders, photographed in India by an Indian photographer, possibly at the time of the Chitral Expedition of 1895.

Photographed by Rhagunath Singh of Nasirabad in India, identified recto in the lower margin. The reverse presents a backplate of generic design, depicting a cupid scattering photographic portraits.  

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections, all of them peripheral, but is otherwise in excellent condition, with very good tonal range. The mount presents a couple of small blemishes verso but is otherwise also in excellent condition. 

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).

 

 

 


price:  £75
code: cat006
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
John Moyer Heathcote

Captain John Moyer Heathcote
Anonymous

A small albumen print portrait of Captain John Moyer Heathcote (1834-1912), of the 1st Huntingdonshire Rifle Volunteer Corps. One contemporary source called him ‘the greatest amateur tennis player of modern times.’ He was one of the committee members at the Marylebone Cricket Club responsible for drafting the original rules of lawn tennis and is credited with devising the cloth covering for the tennis ball.

Born on 12 July 1834, he was the eldest son of John Moyer Heathcote (1800-1892) of Conington Castle in Huntingdonshire. Educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge, he was called to the bar on 17 November 1859.

On 6 July 1861 the Volunteer Service Gazette reported that Heathcote had recently been promoted from Lieutenant to Captain in the service of the Huntingdonshire Rifle Volunteer Corps. In later years he became an Honorary Colonel in the 3rd Volunteer Battalion Suffolk Regiment and Honorary Colonel of the 1st Administrative Battalion of the Cambridge Rifle Volunteers.

John Moyer Heathcote died, aged 78, at Conington Castle on 3 August 1912. According to a short obituary in the Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer (6 August 1912); ‘For 15 years in succession – 1867 to 1881 – Mr Heathcote was the winner of the gold prize of the M.C.C., which, prior to the institution of the amateur championship in 1889, was generally considered to invest the winner with the rank of amateur champion.’ According to his obituary in The Globe (6 August 1912), he was simply ‘the greatest amateur tennis player of modern times.’

Photographer unidentified.

The sitter has inscribed and signed the album page in the lower margin: ‘Yours very truly / J M Heathcote Capt.’

Verso presents another albumen print portrait, this one showing a younger man in civilian dress. The sitter is unidentified.

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections in the area of the background but is otherwise in very good condition. The album page presents a few faint marks and some minor edge wear but is otherwise in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the print measures 3.1” by 2” (7.9 cm by 5.2 cm). The album page on which it is mounted measures 11.4” by 8.7” (29 cm by 22 cm).

 


price:  £125
code: cat007
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Italian cavalry officers

Four Italian cavalry officers
Various photographers

Four cartes-de-visite showing unidentified Italian cavalry officers, including one hand-coloured portrait.

Two of the portraits are by Fratelli d’Alessandri of Rome; one of the portraits is by Altobelli and Molins of Rome; one of the photographers (the hand-coloured portrait) is unidentified.

Condition: two of the prints present some small imperfections and fine spotting; one of the mounts presents some light stains verso; otherwise, condition of prints and mounts is excellent.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard carte-de-visite are approximately 4.1" by 2.5" (10.5 cm by 6.3 cm).


price:  £160
code: cat008
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
A small boy with a German helmet

A small boy with a German helmet
A. Kindermann of Hamburg

A German carte-de-visite portrait of a small boy with a sword and spiked helmet. The open book lying on the floor behind him appears to be a photograph album of some kind. An inked inscription verso in a fine period hand read: ‘Ende 1867.’

Photographed by A. Kindermann of Hamburg in Germany.

Condition: the print presents a few small imperfections and a small amount of fine spotting in the area of the background but has very good tonal range. The mount is clean and firm, with crisp edges and sharp corners.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard carte-de-visite are approximately 4.1" by 2.5" (10.5 cm by 6.3 cm).


price:  £25
code: cat009
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
South Africa, 1900


A young boy in military uniform
Sherwood Photo Company of Mansfield

A cabinet card portrait of a young boy wearing a military uniform and a false moustache.  His costume incorporates something, possibly a tin, on his back, relating to South Africa in 1900. At the time that this photograph was taken, Great Britain was fighting the Second Boer War in South Africa. 

Photographed by the Sherwood Photo Company of Mansfield in Nottinghamshire.

Condition: the print presents some small imperfections, including some black flecks in the area of the background and some fine scuffs in the area of the boy’s trousers, but is otherwise in fine condition, with very good tonal range. The mount presents a small amount of edge wear and verso some grubby marks and one abrasion. Dated 1901 verso in pencil in a period hand.

Dimensions: the dimensions of a standard cabinet card are approximately 6.5” by 4.3” (16.5 cm by 10.8 cm).


price:  £75
code: cat010
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Hythe School of Musketry

 

Rifle Volunteers attending the Hythe School of Musketry, November 1860
Anonymous

An albumen print showing various men who attended the School of Musketry at Hythe in the autumn of 1860. 

‘The Volunteer Force was a citizen army of part-time rifle, artillery and engineer corps, created as a popular movement throughout the British Empire in 1859. Originally highly autonomous, the units of volunteers became increasingly integrated with the British Army after the Childers Reforms in 1881, before forming part of the Territorial Force in 1908. Most of the regiments of the present Territorial Army Infantry, Artillery, Engineers and Signals units are directly descended from Volunteer Force units’ (Wikipedia).

Established in 1853 by Lord Hardinge, the Hythe School of Musketry was charged with maintaining the proficiency of the army in the use of small arms, support weapons and range management.

‘In June 1853 Colonel Hay arrived at Hythe, Kent, with a small staff of officers. On 1 August the first instructor, Colour Sergeant MacKay of the 19th Foot, was appointed. […] The first mention of the establishment of the School was in the Army List of 1854 when it was referred to as the School of Musketry. In September 1855 a Corps of Instructors was added to the establishment, consisting of 100 First Class and 100 Second Class Instructors who, as soon as they were sufficiently experienced (except for three who remained at Hythe), were distributed to Depot Battalions and Regiments as required. These men were the Corps of Instructors of Musketry, a misnomer as muskets were being withdrawn from service – yet the art of the use of long arms to this day is sometimes known as musketry’ (Wikipedia).

An inked inscription in the lower margin reads: ‘The Left Wing (Hythe Nov. 1860)’ underneath which another period hand has added ‘Captain Coles Wing / October 1860.’

Photographer unidentified.

Verso presents a portrait of an unidentified young man in civilian dress. An inked inscription in the lower margin reads: ‘Done at Walmer April/60.’

Condition: the print is excellent condition, with very good tonal range. It is mounted on a bright blue album page, which presents a small amount of wear at two of its corners.

Description: the print measures 5.3” by 7.4” (13.5 cm by 18.8 cm); the album page measures 11.4” by 8.7” (29 cm by 22.2 cm).


price:  SOLD
code: cat011
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Hythe School of Musketry

 

Rifle Volunteers attending the Hythe School of Musketry, November 1860
Anonymous

An albumen print showing various men who attended the School of Musketry at Hythe in the autumn of 1860. 

According to a short paragraph that appeared in the Lancashire Gazette (6 October 1860): ‘The War-office has issued a circular to commanding officers of Volunteer Rifle regiments, informing them of the necessity of making selections of some effective members to attend at Hythe for the purpose of undergoing a course of musketry instruction, with a view to subsequent teaching of the members of the corps to which they are attached.’

The Hythe Manual of Musketry Instruction, ironically a translation of an earlier French manual, had quickly become the standard for all musketry training. ‘How are our Volunteers to become good marksmen?’ asked a journalist writing for the Aberystwith Observer (21 July 1860). ‘Before a man can shoot effectively with a rifle, he must know how to hold it.’ […] Nothing is so deceptive as distance, especially in level places where you see the ground foreshortened. All these things are taught at the Hythe School of Musketry, and we are glad to find that a number of Volunteers have undergone the musketry drill there with exemplary patience. […] The Volunteer Rifleman has entered upon a new exercise in which he cannot afford to take a second rank. He must be with his rifle what his forefathers were with the long-bow, and the only manner in which he can accomplish this is to make rifle-shooting as scientific a pastime throughout the land as cricket.’

An inked inscription in the lower margin reads: ‘2nd section (Right Wing) / Hythe Nov./60’

Photographer unidentified.

Verso presents a portrait of Lieutenant Christopher Hodgson of the 12th (East Suffolk) Foot, in civilian dress. He was apparently also known as ‘The Nobbler,’ according to a pencilled inscription in the lower margin.

Condition: The print presents a few very small imperfections in the area of the background but is otherwise in excellent condition. It is mounted on an apple-green album page, which presents a small amount of wear at two corners and a short tear running off its lower edge.

Description: the print measures 5.6” by 7.7” (14.3 cm by 19.5 cm); the album page measures 11.4” by 8.5” (29 cm by 21.7 cm).


price:  SOLD
code: cat012
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
The Royal Engineers at Devonport

 

The Royal Engineers’ office in Devonport
‘H.D.C.’

Two albumen prints showing the office of the Royal Engineers at Devonport.

 Inked inscriptions identify the views as ‘Royal Engineer Office, Devonport’ and ‘Rear View of the R. E. Office.’ Further inscriptions date the two photographs to December 1858.

Another inked inscription identifies the photographer as ‘H.D.C.’

Condition: the prints presents a few small imperfections but are otherwise in excellent condition, with good tonal range. They are mounted on the same pale green album page.

Dimensions: the prints measure 4.3” by 6.2” (11 cm by 15.8 cm); the album page measures 10.4” by 7” (26.5 cm by 17.9 cm). 

 

 


price:  £70
code: cat013
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Prince George, the Duke of Cambridge

The Duke of Cambridge
William and Daniel Downey of London 

A Woodburytype portrait of Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, the Commander-in-Chief of the British Army. A grandson of King George III, he was first cousin to Queen Victoria.

Born at Cambridge House in Hanover in 1819, he became the second Duke of Cambridge in 1850. The Duke served as Commander-in-Chief of the British Army from 1856 until he was forced to retire in 1895, the longest period for which any one man has served as its head. Although he was deeply concerned about the welfare of soldiers, he earned a reputation for being resistant to change and for making promotions based upon an officer's social standing, rather than his merit. Under his command, the British Army became a moribund and stagnant institution, lagging far behind its continental counterparts. 

George made no secret of his view that ‘arranged marriages were doomed to failure.’ On 8 January 1847, in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act of 1772, he married privately at St John’s Clerkenwell an actress by the name of Sarah Louisa Fairbrother, daughter of the partner in a Bow Street printing firm. Since the marriage did not exist in British law, his wife was never titled Duchess of Cambridge nor styled ‘Her Royal Highness.’ Instead, she was known simply as ‘Mrs FitzGeorge.’ George was distraught when she died in 1890, and regularly marked the anniversary of her death.

The Duke of Cambridge died at Gloucester House, Piccadilly, in 1904 and was buried in Kensal Green cemetery, beside the woman with whom he had shared his life.

Photographed by William and Daniel Downey of London and Newcastle. 

Published as a Woodburytype in 1892 as part of a series entitled The Cabinet Portrait Gallery.

Condition: the Woodburytype shows a couple of small imperfections in the area of the background but is otherwise in excellent condition, as is the page on which it’s mounted. A printed caption in the lower margin identifies the sitter and the photographer’s details are also printed beneath the print.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.5” by 3.7” (14 cm by 9.3 cm) and is mounted with a cream-coloured border on an off-white page measuring 9.5” by 7.6” (24.2 cm by 19.5 cm). 


price:  £40
code: cat014
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Prince Edward, the Prince of Wales

The Prince of Wales
William and Daniel Downey of London

A Woodburytype portrait of Queen Victoria's eldest son, Prince Edward, the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII.

Photographed by William and Daniel Downey of London and Newcastle.

Published as a Woodburytype in 1890 as part of the first series of The Cabinet Portrait Gallery.

Condition: both the Woodburytype and the page on which it is mounted are in excellent condition. A printed caption in the lower margin identifies the sitter and gives ­the photographers’ details.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.5” by 3.7” (14 cm by 9.3 cm) and is mounted with a buff-coloured border on an off-white page measuring 8.1” by 5.9” (20.6 cm by 15 cm).

 


price:  £20
code: cat015
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Prince Albert Victor, the Duke of Clarence

The Duke of Clarence and Avondale
William and Daniel Downey of London

A Woodburytype portrait of Prince Albert Victor (1864-1892), Duke of Clarence and Avondale and Earl of Athlone, the eldest son of Prince Edward, the Prince of Wales and Princess Alexandra of Denmark, the Princess of Wales.

Known as ‘Eddy’ within the family, he was second in line to the throne for all of his life.

He and his younger brother Prince George served as naval cadets until 1883, after which Eddy was sent to Cambridge. In 1885, he joined the 10th Hussars Cavalry Regiment.

Various royal princesses were put forward as prospective brides for the Prince. The first was Alix of Hesse, who did not return his affections (she later became the Empress Marie Feodorovna of Russia). The second was Princess Hélène of Orléans, who did return his affections but refused to give up her Roman Catholic faith. He eventually became engaged to Princess May of Teck, but died before the marriage could take place, aged only 28, of pneumonia at Sandringham on 14 January 1892. His fiancée married his younger brother George instead, and the two eventually became King George V and Queen Mary.

Photographed by William and Daniel Downey of London and Newcastle.

Published as a Woodburytype in 1890 as part of the first series of The Cabinet Portrait Gallery.

Condition: the print is in excellent condition. It is mounted on a piece of clean, stiff, firm card with printed caption and photographers’ details in the lower margin.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.5” by 3.65” (14 cm by 9.3 cm) and is mounted with a buff-coloured border on an off-white page measuring 8” by 6.1” (20.5 mm by 15.4 cm).

 

 


price:  £30
code: cat016
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught

The Duke of Connaught
William and Daniel Downey of London

A Woodburytype portrait of Queen Victoria's third son, Prince Arthur, who was created Duke of Connaught in 1874. He had a long career in the British Army that included service in South Africa, Canada, Ireland, Egypt in 1882 and in India from 1886 to 1890.  On 1 April 1893, he was promoted to the rank of general.

In 1895, when his mother's cousin, the elderly Duke of Cambridge, was forced to retire from his position as commander-in-chief of the Army, Arthur was disappointed when his hopes to replace him were not realized. From 1911 to 1916 he was Governor General of Canada.

Photographed by William and Daniel Downey of London and Newcastle. 

Published as a Woodburytype in 1890 as part of the first series of The Cabinet Portrait Gallery.

Condition: both the Woodburytype and the page on which it is mounted are in excellent condition. A printed caption in the lower margin identifies the sitter and gives ­the photographers’ details.

Dimensions: the print measures 5.5” by 3.7” (14 cm by 93 cm) and is mounted with a buff-coloured border on an off-white page measuring 10” by 8” (25.3 cm by 20.3 cm).

 

 


price:  £30
code: cat017
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Queen Victoria's funeral

 

Queen Victoria’s funeral passing through Windsor
Bender and Lewis of Croydon

A large silver print showing Queen Victoria’s funeral cortège as it passed through Windsor. A pencilled inscription recto in the lower margin reads: ‘Funeral procession of Queen Victoria at Windsor. Bluejackets of “Excellent” drawing the gun carriage, Febr. 4th, 1901.’ In fact, this incident involving the naval detachment took place on the way to Windsor Castle, on Saturday 2 February, not on the 4th.

According to a report in The Times (4 February 1901): ‘At this moment an unfortunate incident marred, for a time, the progress of the cortège. The artillery horses, which for some reason had become rather restless, had only moved a few paces forward when one of them reared and plunged in an exceedingly dangerous manner in front of the gun carriage, behind which the King, the German Emperor, and the Duke of Connaught were walking. All attempts to pacify the animal were altogether unavailing; and at last, as the procession was being seriously delayed, the entire team was removed and their places were taken by a large number of the bluejackets who formed the naval guard of honour. With their ever ready handiness, they turned the traces and chains of the harness into draw ropes, fitted them to the gun-carriage, and themselves drew it with its precious burden from the station to the chapel. Queen Alexandra, and the Princesses of the Royal Family, all of whom were in deep mourning, had previously driven to the St George’s Chapel direct.

‘It should be mentioned that the officers of the detachment who performed the duty of drawing the gun carriage at Windsor were Lieutenant the Hon. Algernon Boyle, of the Excellent, who was in command, Sub-Lieutenants  Percy Noble and Aubrey Peebles, of the Royal Naval College, and Midshipman L.S. Holbrook and J.W. Gibson, of the Majestic. On their arrival at the Chapel the King sent a message to Lieutenant Boyle directing him to convey to the Naval Brigade his Majesty’s thanks for the timely aid they had rendered, and for the seamanlike manner in which they had carried out their unexpected duty.’

Photographed by Bender and Lewis of Croydon, identified by their blindstamp recto in the lower right-hand corner.

Condition: the print presents some foxing in the area of the sky (upper left-hand corner) but is otherwise in excellent condition, with good tonal range. The album page on which it is mounted presents a small amount of foxing verso but is otherwise also in excellent condition.

Dimensions: the print measures 11.1” by 8.8’ (28.3 cm by 22.4 cm); the album page on which it is mounted is just a fraction larger. 


price:  £80
code: cat018
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs
Queen Victoria's funeral

 

Queen Victoria’s funeral cortège at Windsor Castle
Russell and Sons of Windsor

A large silver print showing Queen Victoria’s funeral procession crossing the Quadrangle at Windsor Castle, followed by various European kings and queens and other members of her family. The new king, Edward VII, can be clearly seen walking immediately behind the gun carriage carrying his late mother. To his right is the German kaiser, Wilhelm II, and to his left is his brother, Prince Arthur, the Duke of Connaught.

An inked inscription recto in the lower margin reads: ‘Queen Victoria’s funeral – procession crossing the Quadrangle, Windsor.’

Photographed by Russell and Sons of Windsor, according to a blindstamp recto in the lower right-hand corners.

Condition: the print presents a small amount of silver mirroring at two of its edges but is otherwise in excellent condition, with very good tonal range. The album page on which it is mounted presents a small amount of foxing but is otherwise clean, firm and solid.

Dimensions: the print measures 10.9” by 8.5” (27.9 cm by 21.5 cm); the album page on which it is mounted is slightly larger.


price:  £80
code: cat019
Paul Frecker - Fine Photographs